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focuses on reaction to public and -- republican presidential candidate mitt romney mormonism and his thoughts on what it says about religious tolerance today. mr. campbell takes audience questions for an hour and 20 minutes. >> thank you very much for those words and the introduction. it is nice to be here. as a notre dame guy that is really saying something. i have mixed feelings coming here. i have never been to u.s. c before but i know all about this place. one saturday every year it is u.s. c all the time. i was very pleased when i was in the bookstore today. i buy a t-shirt from every campus allied deposit a little money to get my t-shirt but i was pleased to see a table in the bookstore with a bunch of leprechauns for sale. very classy move. then i walked up to and realize this was a notre dame flag bearers selling because of st. patrick's day. and a biographical information about myself might be relevant for the discussion. i teach at notre dame which means there can be a little confusion about my own biography. people often assume i am catholic. i teach and write on american
with what i talk about in the book. >> chris christi has endorsed mitt romney. >> i hang on everything so i guess i am a mitt romney role. no, i really am. i think it's going to be mitt romney and i'm going to write about that in my column. i've had it with the upstarts. he's not ronald then a fantastic in the the date, and best of all, he has a demonstrated the ability to track the liberals into voting for him. >>> up next thomas sat down with book tv at georgetown university to talk about his book embryo politics. efiks and policy in a atlantic democracies. this is just over 15 minutes. >> we are watching booktv on c-span2, and every month we visit a different university to talk to professors who are also authors about their looks and now joining us on book tv is thomas banchoff, and he is the author of this book, and brio politics. professor banchoff, what do you mean by embryo politics? >> it is said to turn a critical ethical questions about when human life begins and deserves protection and when embryos might be sacrificed in scientific experiments for knowledge. it's something we are
is mitt romney in the breakthrough team in massachusetts in 2006 when he sang into a massachusetts health care reform, which took a new approach that had been tried before an approach i call incremental universalism. incremental borrow from the right, meaning leave people alone if they like what they have, but how people if the system doesn't hurt. universal borrow from the last time i meaningless get universal coverage. this has not been tried before. this is not a rip it up and start over approach. the state must recognize politically we can't take away thinks people like to get to universal coverage. he set up a system which i like to think of as a three-legged stool. the first leg was to end discrimination in the insurance market, two and a flawed system in america where people are just one bad gene are one bad traffic accident away from bankruptcy. the second step was an individual mandate so insurance companies could price insurance fairly common selling into the newly reformed market. and the third step to subsidies with health insurance to be affordable for individual mandates. th
has endorsed a romney. >> i haying on everything chris christie says i am the mitt romney bureau now. i am. i think it will be him. he is not ronald reagan. he is not running. he is the best alternative. and he has us demonstrated abilities to trick the liberals into voting for him [laughter] >> [no audio] i am delighted to have you here. friends and family and those interested in american history. i will speak about the book about 15 minutes then it answers some questions. first, i did a book on a liberal president, and the conservative court. have you heard of those? of course. not currently but franklin roosevelt and the hughes court of the 1930's. 75 years ago. win roosevelt announced the court packing plant that is the subject of my book that i will talk to in a moment. the clash between roosevelt and hughes added critical time in history is a great story and important one. raising the question that was important 75 years ago and today. if life tenure justices of the supreme court can thwart the will alternatively, if the elected president can try to been to the court to his pol
named george romney, author of a certain presidential candidate said it was implemented and he rode on the occasion he said on the occasion in the 1970's of this very first mortgage-backed securities being issued this event marked a revolutionary step forward to increase the funds available for the mortgage financing but in a figuring of 2000, the subprimal lending program to the predatory lenders and unscrupulous house flippers' distraught home buyers. the government found itself unable to sell the houses they had to foreclose on. first denying the problem romney was forced to freeze it in 1971 yet even as the particular lending program ended, the mortgage-backed securities blossomed for higher-quality middle class homes. securitization works as an instrument to connect the demand and a global capital. these new bonds for any kind of house transformed global finance. bypassed traditional banks which could make the loans to allow money to come from almost anywhere from small-town banks, union tensions and european investors. all of them could buy american mortgages in your home town
'll carry oklahoma. host: and when we move past this primary stage, is mitt romney the eventual nominee? what are his chances against president obama? guest: he is the more moderate of the four -- well, it's kind of hard. you can't measure ron paul that way because his is not, you know, a liberal conservative dichotomy. what you would have is a mitt romney who is pretty moderate. he will pick up a lot of independent votes. and i think he'll probably do very well if he is the one. and i think those people who thing that this primary is hurting the republicans, look back hysterically. that's not what happened. that -- historically. that's not what happened. it energized the base. it's like the meeting in copenhagen. they all hated me. in this case, one thing they have in common is they all want to defeat obama. so you have an exercise base with four groups going with that ultimate goal. so i don't think it's going to hurt the republicans' chances. host: would you be happy with a mitt romney presidency? guest: as opposed to obama? yes. host: let's go back to call. tulsa, oklahoma. frazier.
would be for romney in this race? >> another one of falwell's contributions is get to evangelical to be nonbeliever. he relied on another thinker to say to be:belligerent he always have to have examples to help jesus carry his cross. there is always a biblical analysis. i think romney not only deals with that but i think his mormanism helps him. because without that, he is just a moderate former governor who signed health care reform but what evangelicals no is conservative, underwrote the campaign for proposition viii. i am not sure it plays the current narrative that they say that it does. >> host: i am sure it is more complicated voters say they care passionately about voters believes a great deal voting against romney and also worried about the mormon president. >> that comes to play with the committee that has some mistrust the you could vote for him over obama. two last questions. maybe a wold. i was fascinated of the notion the church was a prototype for what is the megachurch. is important not to confuse it with a rate wing politics but of that is not the case but you tal
of government so they are up for grabs. i would have said mitt romney will be a perfect candidate to appeal but i am not sure now. there is so much disarray. knows where things will stand by the time this shares. but to they are the fund-raisers, raising many, there are plenty of them out there but driven out of office because of the move to the right. >> host: did you hear anger or sadness? >> both. many, there are plenty of them out there but driven out of office because of the move to the right. >> host: did you hear anger or sadness? >> both. talking to legislators to fall into that category. some who were in their felt very marginalized by the more conservative leadership. so they did feel there was not room for them. >> you the largest of the four groups? >> no. >> host: getting to the other three starbucks mom and dad's where did you find them? >> the starbucks moms and dads are the decide years of the election as suburban moms and dads. more than 50 percent of all americans now live in suburbs. in 1980 was 30%. it is growing rapidly. their racially diverse. and they swing. they care
could envision mitt romney winning the election but no one is very enthusiastic about the guy. the good side of that would be is if conservatives put more attention on congress as a place to get our national leadership. our model for the last 40 years has been great, if you get a conservative present for a semi-concert president and you run to the white house to the meeting was something going wrong and you want to present, that's the liberal model. instead of expecting our help to come from the white house, we instead spend more time and attention on congress. that used to be the conservative view. if you go back to 1950s, look at the conservative political scientist historians, they were all saying liberals but all the chips on the president. and we should. there is a reason that article i is about congress. that was supposed to be the preeminent of the three branches for moving the country law. and the most limited branch. so this would be a return. what i'm is just would be a return to the older conservative attitude about how you should regard the relative priority of the three bra
thing and this is the challenge for conservatives, a thought experiment you could envision mitt romney winning the election but nobody is enthusiastic about the guy. the good side of that would be of conservatives put more attention on congress as a place we get our national leadership from rather than the white house, our model of the last 30 or 40 years has been great if you get a conservative president or semi conservative president under the white house to have a meeting with something going on and you want the president -- that is the liberal model it would be a good thing if instead of expecting our help to come from the white house we spend more of our time and attention on congress. that used to be the conservative view if you go back to 1950's and the conservative political science and historians of they were all saying there is a reason that article 1 is about congress and the longest article in the constitution that was supposed to be the preeminent of the branches for moving the country along and the most the lubber this branch, and so this would be a return. what i'm sugge
that romney would be a perfect candidate to appeal to these npr republicans. i am not sure now. there has been so much disarray and in the republican primary, and by the time this ayers who knows where things will stand in the republican primary? but i will say the npr republicans are the fund-raisers. they raise the money for the republican party. there are plenty of them out there. they are out of office because of the move to the right. >> host: did you hear it from them, sadness or anger more? >> guest: both, both. certainly in new hampshire, i talked to a number of former and current state legislators who had fallen to the mpr republican category. some had lost primaries and have been driven out of the legislature and some who were still in there trying to -- marginalized by the republican leadership in the new hampshire state legislature said they did feel the party had been sort of taken over and that there wasn't room for them. >> host: do you think there is a larger group? >> guest: not by a longshot. >> host: let's get to the other three groups. you have the starbucks moms and dads,
. and so they are very much up for grabs this time around. i would have said that mitt romney would be a perfect candidate to appeal to these in pr republicans. i'm not sure now. there has been so much disarray in the republican primary. by the time in -- who knows where things stand. but i will say, the npr republicans are the fund-raisers they raise the money for the republican party. there are plenty of them out there, but they have been driven out of office because of the move to the right. >> host: did you hear from them sadness our anchor? >> guest: both. both. civilly in new hampshire i talked to a number of former and current state legislators who would fall into that npr republican category. some have lost primaries, been driven out of the legislature. some still in there trying to fight but to fill very marginalized by the more conservative republican in the new hampshire state legislature. so they did feel the party had been sort of taken over and that there wasn't room for them in the party. >> host: the largest of your four groups. >> guest: not by a long shot. no. >> h
. it is a state-by-state basis. >> exit stage left. shifting back to politics, one way mitt romney did in massachusetts, worked in massachusetts but would not necessarily be the right thing for the nation. from an economic perspective any particular reason the massachusetts approach would not scale nationwide? >> no. [laughter and applause] >> basically mitt romney had a choice. he had a choice of three things he could have done. he could have done what newt gingrich did and this about it and said i made a mistake. it is in the paths. he could have said was the right thing to do and a great idea. he tried the middle ground of saying the massachusetts, not for everyone else. he sort of told a couple of disingenuous things. that is why it is a good idea. raise taxes because the fed pays for bail. it is cheaper to argue that. then he said it is not right for the rest of the country. i may not work for the rest of the country. it does work for the rest of the country. >> last question stage right. >> we estimate there are probably a thousand people who are homeless, some for reasons of the
up for grabs this time around, and i would have said that mitt romney would be the perfect candidate to appeal to these npr republicans. i'm not sure now come and by the time who knows where things will stand. i will say that the npr republicans are the fund-raisers but there are plenty of them out there and they've been out of office because of the move to the right and. >> host: did you hear from them sadness or anchor more? >> guest: both. certainly in new hampshire i talked to a number of former and current state legislators in the republican category. some have lost primaries driven of the legislature and some were still in their trying to fight and were marginalized by the more conservative republican leadership in new hampshire state for as richard so they felt the party had been sort of taken over and there wasn't room for that. >> host: are the largest of the four groups? >> guest: not by a longshot. note. >> host: let's get to the others starting now. >> host: you have the starbucks moms and dads and locate them in virginia. >> guest: that i think is the largest starbucks m
the game going forward as governor romney running as a mormon has made it easier for himself. that is a great legacy. and and important barrier. >> one of the things that the movie makes clear but do have a future beyond the campaign, and the portion of the republicans and the populist grass-roots part of the party became a huge important part but then to see again and then she still speaks to those people but for the future of that and then in 2016 it is said huge story. sarah palin and will always be emblematic of that change in the party. amend then will be as visible as anybody. >> what ended up on the cutting room floor? >> besides my line? [laughter] did you get a cameo also? >> [laughter] there is one scene i wish we had time for. it is arbitrary limit of two stores by personally love to those pauses, the moments i don't want to cut it so quickly but not have the moments to think what the hell is going on? one of the scenes phi misses the scene where talking to the lawyers about why they had to do the vet in total secrecy. partly because of the vermette idea had slippe
that might play in a second term for obama. and from ken, who would romney prefer, a -- who would china prefer, a romney president or a second term obama? >> i'll say a brief word on pakistan, obviously very challenging. i think our afghanistan policy could fail probably because of pakistan's role. that because the politics in many kabul and the future of karzai are the key threat toss the mission, i think. in terms of the u.s./pakistan partnership, i give this administration reasonably decent grades for keeping on trying when nothing was working. and on afghanistan i think their messaging and their teamwork was relatively mediocre. by contrast, towards pakistan i think the strategic dialogue and a lot of the outreach was pretty good. mistakes we made on messaging in afghanistan affected pakistan policy, i believe, so i don't want to completely establish a distinction between the two. but i think this administration's been extremely mature and disciplined and realist on pakistan. we don't have any choice but to keep working the relationship. there have been things that have gone up and
republican debate where mitt romney was trying to defend his health care mandate say what we did in massachusetts was okay, but the federal version doesn't. what's the difference said michele bachmann. well, massachusetts is a state. the states to do with it want. bachmann said i think that the states nor congress should be able to do this, and she invoked this basic notion of autonomy which is spelled out in one of the briefs in the health care case which cites none other than roe v. wade. justice kennedy's opinion in the sweet mystery case where they say the right to define your own consumption of the meaning of life should prevent the government from telling you to buy health care. that is the completely intellectually coherent position my friends at the cato institute, a libertarian think tank in washington, are fiercely pro-choice, pro gay marriage and anti health care mandate. they want to restrict the government from making as by health care or telling us we can mario will begin do with the bodies. justice kennedy is the only justice on the supreme court who has some sympa
that romney, you know, they're outdoing even other with their patriotism. south carolina's a very military industrial complex state. so at one point romney said when he was challenged, ron paul was talking about getting out of foreign wars, and all the other candidates were jumping on him and saying that they, we had to defeat terrorism abroad, and the american security came first. and romney actually said something to the effect, and i'm paraphrase, i will go anywhere and kill them. in order to outdo rick perry and so forth. so here's a fellow who may be, you know, this is the kind of hysteria that builds upon so that the enemy is pretty much anywhere in the world and is reachable. >> that is the advantage of saying the enemy is terrorism because it means nothing, or it means everything. you can target a person anywhere in the world and say person or group of people are terrorists and target and kill them. i mean, one of the most shocking things, i think, in recent months has been, essentially, obama signing a law which gives the president power to order the killing of any american citize
business with mormons who they consider heterodox and religious matter, but i actually think romney's mormonism helped them with but evangelical christians because without that, he's just a moderate former governor of massachusetts who signed health care reform provides tax care funding over abortion. where would evangelical home they know it went against proposition 8. i am not sure that it plays the way the current narrative says that it plays in terms of fundamentalist dealing with romney. it's much more concentrated than not. >> i'm sure it's much more complicated. you can't live with the narrative says they care passionately about a candidate's religious belief in the republican primaries and seem to be voting against romney. >> i do think evangelical pastors are very tight terrified of having a morning person it would confer upon that religion. >> factors you're talking about making the plate in the general election is a community that may have some bigotry in some cases, but certainly the logical mistrust that combo for him over obama. >> ,. two last questions really. i have
think romney said he will repeal is the first thing he wants to do, but then he says, well, we have to repeal and replace and i am glad i have shown what i will replace it with. that is not cutting it. >> and it is interesting. all three of us are critics of omnicare. so probably mr. romney is not any of us are going to be secretary of hhs. but i just cannot understand why mr. romney will not say if that is a good idea for massachusetts. we have the evidence and ended not good. so i made a mistake. but he won't do that, so that is what makes it very, very frightening. so i'm going to buy an old ship, not the one that crashed off the italian coast. i will set up my liberty ship and they can all get our health on the liberty ship. >> i would like to also underscore what the seven what mr. shadegg said white is so critical congress gets it right this summer. they will cite an important element for the future of the health care system should go at the health care law can get repealed. and i will say also should be a cohesive plan and not just enough of that soup fan of everyone's idea t
of the exchange working and we had by partisan political support around the bill including governor mitt romney, republicans signed the bill. you have a real consensus around it. everyone was on board to make it work. now try to do this in states like texas, arkansas, alabama, georgia. states that don't have much in insurance regulation and all, something they don't do much. and have much capacity for but also where there's real political resistance to doing it. that is going to be more of a bureaucratic concern than bureaucratic bloat to the federal level. >> host: this viewer is asking if insurance companies will offer multi family discount. mandate to have insurance, will this create a new market? >> guest: the premise is you get more people into the pool. that is the idea. right now problem is people who try to buy insurance on their own have a hard time because insurers can just reject that if you have a preexisting condition or charge a ton and the rates are very high because the pool is not big enough. you only have people in the pool who think they need insurance. if this doesn't really
to be able to take the. romney will turn it up and he has the organization to do it. you can fly by the seat of your pet for a while but you can't fly by the seat of your pants the entire primary season. >> thank you. good luck. >> thank you. how are you? >> how are you a? >> great. take care of yourself. hi, how are you? >> hello. >> my head was down. having fun? >> yes. >> nice to meet you. >> thank you so much. >> take care. >> how are you? >> thank you, take care. thank you. have a good one. how are you? how's it going? >> good. how are you? >> you will enjoy it, i promise. enjoy, listen to my speech, laugh. how are you doing? >> you got here tonight sorry. great to see you. >> how are you? >> glad you made it. >> i know. i'm sorry. good to see you. >> thank you so much for coming. >> thank you. sorry i'm so late. >> take care. hi, how are you, how is it going? >> good. >> here we go. nice to see you. how are you? >> good. how are you. i just want to say thank you for your radio show. >> e-mail our website. put in turn on the subject line. >> how are you? >> i wanted to meet you. >> than
've not spoken with governor romney, but i've heard recently that people talking to him have been telling him about what's going on and hopefully he understands wall street and hopefully he would be able to get it. my hope is that he would be able to defend the america's interests and not wall street's interests. the funny things goldman sachs and the firms that are most under attack, they don't like what i've written because they make an awful lot of money off of the secret weapons that i've described. i like goldman sachs and i think they're important to our system. but these are problems that need to be dealt with. so hopefully governor romney -- hopefully they all get it but i only had the opportunity to get information directly to speaker gingrich and to senator santorum and hopefully soon i'll get it to governor romney. if you know him, tell him. he needs to read the book. >> this really isn't a partisan issue, though. this really involves everybody, all of us. >> i have briefed members of the administration. i've briefed pentagon. absolutely, in fact, a copy of the book recently went t
say that. [inaudible] >> but first say -- >> romney said he want to increase the number of prisoners there, not just not get rid of it. >> that's part of the legislation but it would use thank you to all prisoners. it's interesting, actually several years ago i made an argument at a time of the surge that maybe it was imprudent forced to close guantÁnamo given that there's a modicum of habeas corpus, and a modicum of transfatty, a modicum mind you at guantÁnamo. or else are we detaining detainees, under what conditions and for how long? we don't really know. there are 3000 detainees at the moment in bagram, 3000 in bagram. who knows where else? and being held under conditions that apparently are not, are not as good, you would say, as at guantÁnamo. and guantÁnamo isn't a happy place of course. interesting. so romney wants to increase the number. in that he is in very good company. >> so, we kind of take it as a historical inevitability that the u.s. is there, but did castro ever, during his might, did he ever tried to take over guantÁnamo? was ever in jeopardy? you know, and wh
this sense of everyone is afraid. people are excited. all the candidates have done a good job. mitt romney was strong, wreck was terrific and we will hear a lot more in coming days and this is good. this is a very good thing. >> host: how do you assess the ratings? >> guest: rick santorum experiencing what other candidate to experience. can he take it now? mitt romney will turn it up and has the organization to do it. he can fly by the seat of his pants for a while but not for an entire primary season. >> host: good luck. how are you? >> thank you. take care of yourself. how are you? my head is down. how are you doing? having fun? good to see you. they will do it for you. you can do it right there. all right, goodbye. how are you? take care. have a good one. how are you? how is it going? enjoy it. you will laugh. i promise. how are you? >> good. how are you? laughed. how are you doing? it was a little -- great to see you. how are you? glad you made it. i am hosting o'reilly tonight. the worst timing. thank you. sorry i am so late. nice to see you. thank you. how are you? >> good. how are y
the bill including the then governor mitt romney, are republican, who signed the bill, this real consensus around it and everyone was onboard to make it work. now you're going to try to do it in states like texas, arkansas, alabama, georgia, states that, a, just don't have much insurance regulation right now at all. that's just not something that they do very much of and don't have much capacity for, but also where there will be a real political resistance for doing this. that will be more of a bureaucratic concern than the bureaucratic load at the federal level. host: this viewer is asking do you think insurance companies will offer multi-family discounts since there is a mandate to have insurance? will this create a new market? guest: well, yes, that's sort of the premise that you're requiring people to have insurance, you're going to get more people into the pool. that is really the idea here. right now, the problem somebody that people who try to buy insurance on their own have a really hard time of it, a, because in some states insurance companies can reject someone with a preexisting
for women candidates going forward and a great way for the country just as mitt romney running as a person who is a mormon this time around made that a lot easier for himself. that is a great legacy and important barrier to have -- not eliminated the that least reduced. >> one of the things the movie makes clear is governor sarah palin has a future beyond this campaign and she clearly has. she had that future largely because of the rise of a portion of the republican coalition that was not as important in 2008 and in 2000 and the populist grass-roots part of the party people refer to as the tea party became an important part of the electorate in 2010 and it is playing out again in 2012 and the republican primary. the republican coalition flipped between the old school or traditional mainstream establishment wing and the more populist -- she speaks to those people and the future of the republican party that tension began to what kind of republican party we get in 2012 and what we get in 2014-16 is a big huge story and sarah palin will always be emblematic of that change in party. we don't k
for romney and santorum and ron paul and newt gingrich up until super tuesday they had spent a total for the candidates of $53 million am not one week and they raised hundred million dollars. so they say and do anything. of course it'. so they are huge. they were out there they will say and do anything. of course it's a lot easier for them now since citizens united has used not only raise unlimited corporate money but she don't have to report each corporations are paying which builds. but they also could not do it without the assistance of the nation's media. and that is what drives me crazy. i see it every day and night scene for a variety of reasons but i see some of it is to budget cutbacks and newspapers were just don't have as many people as they had to do some good independent investigative reporting. but some of this is just because they are lazy and they don't want to do the work and instead they just take the lines fed to them and turn around and repeat them. listen to this from walter cronkite appeared just before he died. cronkite said, what do i regret? well, i regret tha
, talking about mitt romney's dog on the roof as a major campaign issue, it is about trivialities. john mccain is not a trivial man. he is a serious man. he would have been a fine commander in chief. i think that the country would be in better position today had john mccain been the president. obviously the american people decided otherwise and you have to accept the verdict of the american people. >> time for one more question. the gentleman in the blue shirt and blue tie. >> kyle simmons, virginia statesman. felt like i was sitting on the staff meetings and private events during the campaign. as for mark and john, steve said earlier there were things he would never talk about that happened in the campaign but is there one moment you wish you could have heard about or been part of or seen? >> we did a creditable job describing what it was like in sarah palin's hotel suite during the week of the republican convention. those four or five days but if you ask where i would most likely to have been baked into the wall, because as chaotic as the film portrays that momentum was much more chao
a mitt romney becomes the next president of the united states and how we deal with iran? >> change for the worse is much more probable than likely then change for the better. but i would agree with you that obviously there is bureaucratic inertia and there is institutions that are going to take a tremendous amount of willpower to be able to change. i think perhaps one of the mistakes, shortcomings, of this massive movement behind obama that by now probably is quite disappointing and they were hoping for other things, is that a lot of organizations, a lot of the grassroots kind of took a vacation once obama was in office. there was a belief perhaps that you know, he is there and he is going to take care of it and they won't have access as the opponents of obama sought, as the bureaucrats who prefer the status quo and obama fails to reactivate the draft. without that you're not going to see any change. i don't believe it's impossible and on the contrary it is quite possible. we have seen very interesting shifts in u.s. policy in the past, but they usually have taken place during a ti
for romney. >> how much? >> it was for a thousand bucks. i could have done more, but -- >> he's hoping for sales of the book. >> i just waited because i have effectively pissed everyone off in america with the co-chairmanship of this commission. and we know we've succeeded so far because we have pissed off everyone in america. and erskine go all over this country, we don't do bullshit, and we get standing ovations. people are thirsting for -- [inaudible conversations] and then how you stabilize social security. >> yes. >> not good and old senior wherw do you do something with medicare which is eating a whole -- doesn't matter what you care, call it elvis presleycare. anyway, keeper candidating them. irritating them. [inaudible conversations] >> well, we enjoy a little bit of cody coming to d.c. >> madness. who are these people? >> i know, i know. >> all your fans. >> well, i tell you, it is bizarre. and i didn't get a nickel off this -- >> oh, shoot. >> well, you have to change that. second printing. come on, you said a couple jokes for them, right? >> don hardy, the author. he's speak
-- wonderful mode and moan in the presidential debate where mitt romney was trying to defend his health care mandate saying what we did in massachusetts was okay but the federal version isn't. nasa chooses as a state in the difference is the state can do what they want and not congress and bachmann says i think neither states nor congress should be able to defend sheehan focused basic notion of autonomy which is built on one of the briefs and the health care case which sites none of it than the roe v. wade and justice kennedy's opinion in the case where they say the meaning of life should revamp the government to tell you to buy health care. that is an intellectually incoherent -- and the folks at the -- justice kennedy is the only justice on the supreme court who has sympathy. do i expect he would save roe v. wade to strike him a mandate? know he wouldn't go that far. scalia and alito and roberts, this is bound to make their head explode. to them roe v. wade is the root of all constitutional evil. who says rome must pay loughner, robert orrick and for them they won't have any of this. that'
't going to answer. >> i would have to say i just wrote a check yesterday to romney. >> oh, you did? >> yeah. >> for how much? >> it was for a thousand bucks. i could have done more, but i haven't earned enough money, and i don't get anything from this book. >> he's hoping to get sales from the book. >> i just waited because i've effectively pissed off everyone in america with the co-chairmanship of this commission which is a very bad thing to do. and we know we've succeeded so far because we have pissed off everyone in america. and erskine and i go all over this country, spoken to about 500,000 people. we don't do bullshit or mud, and we get a standing ovation. people are thirsting, thirsting for somebody to tell them what a trillion bucks is -- >> what? >> a trillion bucks is. and then how you stabilize social security. >> yes. >> not good and old seniors, how do you do something, medicare which is eating a hole through -- call it obamacare, call it elvis presleycare, it can't work. anyway, keeper rating them. >> how are you? [inaudible conversations] >> who are these people? >> i
the first day in town. >> a lot of the other candidates have experienced the question. mitt romney will turn it up and he has the organization to it. he can fly by the seat of his pants for a while but can't fly by the seat of your pants -- has to step up. >> we love that. how are you? thank you. take care of yourself. how are you? my head is down. how are you doing? having fun? good to see you. [inaudible conversations] >> thank you so much. >> hi, how are you? thank you. take care. thank you. have a good one. how are you? how it going? enjoy it. you will laugh. i promise. how are you? great. enjoy. laugh. how are you doing? sorry. great to see you. how are you? glad you made it. i am hosting o'reilly tonight. the worst timing. thank you. great to see you. thank you. however you? thank you for being here. take care. how is it going? here it goes. there we go. nice to see you. >> i want to say thank you for your radio show. >> fantastic. come over -- e-mail our [talking over each other] >> thank you. i am posting a 0 riley. >> glad you got in. >> thank you. how are you doing? nice to see you
against iran? >> yes. i think obey an election issue visa and travel. romney has come on with who is going to be the more patriotic, who is going to be stronger in the usual american muscle. i think iran will be already assassinated or israel is that you are supporting. and it's a very dangerous time. the nuclear issue is the same people out there, even the iaea come in the international atomic engine hasn't infiltrated by us with the japanese style. we put this guy in india suspect he tested his commitments commitments to us. her rady, egyptian who was anonymous and endless out and this is a very dangerous situation and the israelis providing a lot of the information against iran, which makes it like the wmd information, suspect. but what we are seen as it can be solved to the american public on the web is this television works. you keep mentioning iran has the bat guy. it just sinks into a consciousness. says a political state. who think obama is a politician and he's going to run a whatever gets them alike did. the same way you'll never elect cuba because he has to win in florida. >> so
or democrat in the white house? do you see any change should mitt romney be the next president of the united states in how we deal with iran? >> change for the worse is more likely than change for the better. i would agree with you. obviously there is bureaucratic inertia and institutions that are going to take a tremendous amount of willpower. one of the mistakes, shortcomings of this massive movement. they were hoping for other things. a lot of the grassroots kind of took a vacation once obama was in office. there was a belief that he is going to take care of this. bureaucrats who prefer the status quo and obama failed to reactivate his grass-roots. we will not see any change. i don't believe it is quite possible, and this policy in the past has usually taken place during that time in which circumstances were different and the executive branch was stronger. it took place because there was a mass mobilization that was sustainable and they didn't go back home. this is not a criticism against any particular group. those who really want to see a significant change have to acknowledge that. jus
that we can't win with any of the candidates as was displayed in the movie, pawlenty and romney. we were going to be outspent by $200 million. president bush, his approval rating was in the 30s. barack obama was speaking to crowds of hundreds of thousands in europe. there was a fervor for his candidacy on the part of the press and trying to figure out how to win. i am the person is said we should take a look at sarah palin. you know, from alaska. you know, that moment slows down in my brain. [laughter] we spent a couple of days at the jersey shore and i remember everything, i remember every aspect of the moment. i could smell the smell of long beach island, the salt air, you know, the cars in front of the house. i would pick up the phone and i called rick davis and they said we should take a look at sarah palin. the vetting that was done, i said to rick that it's very important and rick was in charge of the vetting process campaign, that she be fully and completely vetted like all the other candidates, and can we do with 10 lawyers or 20 lawyers and a couple of days what we have done wit
in the white house next year, whether it's michelle obama, or ann romney, or someone else, we'll be expecting her to follow ellen wilson's lead, whether she knows it or not. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you so much, kristi. virginia scharff is distinguished professor of history and director of the center for the southwest at the university of new mexico. the scholarly booked include taking the wheel, women in the coming of the motor age, and 20,000 roads, women's movement and the west, and two text books. she was a research fellow at young university in 2008. and is woman chair of the autry national center in los angeles. she was president of the western history association in 2008. in case you have extra reading time, under the name of virginia swift, she is the author of several mysteries. today she is speaking on the women jefferson loved. >> it's great to be back in tucson, greet see judy again did. get my ph.d here at the university of arizona and i'm thrilled be back in my old neighborhood. so thank you for having me here. this book, the women jefferson loved, is about the w
, then we can have lower taxes, fine but no one is running elections on that case. romney on the budget says president obama's failing to take on the problem of entitlement and the first president to -- medicare. we are talking about taxes, paying for what it is that we want. [applause] >> i want to link both of those questions and also follow up on that.. the government together with the private sector in complex ways played a crucial role in the age of computers. of course the internet started as a dfar -- department of defense products, in genomics, and space signs, and many of the absolute crucial world changers that were crucial for our economy as well as for our well-being. none of this happened overnight. all of it required some foresight and some extended national effort. president kennedy in 1961 did not say we will put a man on the moon and bring him safely back to earth by the next election. [laughter] he gave nasa a full decade to do it. he said at the end of this decade. when was the last time we had taken on a national project in recent years that extends beyond the stimulus, b
is making that case. not really. i've got mitt romney responding on the budget by saying president obama is taking off entitlements and furthermore he's the first price in it to cut medicare. so we're talking about taxes because we need to pay for what it is we want. [applause] >> i want to link both of those questions and also follow up on that play. the government together with the durand complex phase played a crucial role in dhs computers, of course an internet we started as a department of defense project in genomics, in space science, and many of the absolute crucial world changes that were crucial for our economy as well as for her well-being. none of this happened overnight. all all of the required sound foresight and some extended national effort. president kennedy in 1961 did not say would put a man on the world to bring him safely back to work every back to election. he said by the end of this decade. when is the lack time we take on a project that extends beyond the stimulus, beyond the next year. we're not doing it anymore. so if you want affect his government, we have to th
, doug, that's a side of you that's unknown to me. >> i've been outed. mitt romney and i both speak french. [laughter] >> we're going to open up for questions. i did want to ask as a journalist, i'm very jealous because these are great books. best of breed among science writing. and they do something that i'm really struck by, they tell stories. and holly's particularly, you had this idea that you're in 19th sent -- 17th century france. and you certainly think you're in new york, and you're in rural france with doug's book. want to speak briefly about the narrative of how you turned these into real stories rather than just straight reporting? and i'm assuming it's consciously done. >> well, i had in my mind agatha christie when i wrote my book. and she was, actually, the early agatha christie's where she has very clever, intricate, devious, calculating poison killings were one of the things i was thinking about when i wrote the book. so i wanted it to be in the new york city of the 1920s. i wanted people l to feel like they were there. so when you actually read the book, there's a l
. mitt romney would not be making a big story, it means 99% occupy wall street, european capitalism in crisis, american capitalism in crisis. this is the current issue of the economist. none of that would have happened. i recognize, and 5 watched one more sitcom when this book came out it would be timely and that is what happened here by accident. the origin of the book that just finished called superbugs, that was done pretty well now, about the 1% of the 1% of the 1%. i just finished it and one of the things that struck me is about the most powerful people in the world. most of the ones that really were powerful were powerful because they were associated with being private organizations. it was the rising power of those organizations and the ways that that power had arisen in ways that defied what we were talking graduate school and undergraduate schools and the way we think of the world, players have gotten so big that it really amounted to a game changer in the way international relations took place. i was interested in why that happened and what fueled it and where it might lea
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